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Viewing: Stewart, Charles H., (Cappy)

3 results found.

MS085 - Liberty Pole Association

Scope and content: Records of the Liberty Pole Association, which document efforts to raise money for a flag, flagpole, and a bronze tablet to commemorate early colonial resistance to the British stamp laws. Bulk of the material is between 1907-1913, with other material from the 1970s. See also: S0982, the subscribers list for a flag in 1834, and PS2063. FF 01: Subscription List, 1824 (copy) FF 02: Petition, 1899 FF 03: Subscription List, 1899 FF 04: Appeals for donations - 1834,1899,1913 FF 05: Donor list, 1907 FF06: Meeting records, 1912-1914 FF 07: Treasurer's accounts, 1913-1934 FF 08: Receipts for expenditures, 1908-1913 FF 09: Donors, 1913 FF 10: Donor notes

Image of P07_44_01 - Harriman Photograph Collection

P07_44_01 - Harriman Photograph Collection

Sheafe's Warehouse on its original location, Mechanic Street, Portsmouth, NH. The building was being moved to its current site within Prescott Park. The building was believed to be owned by the Wentworth family, but in the early 20th century, Cappy Stewart, a local antique dealer, named it the Sheafe's Warehouse.

Image of P07_44_02 - Harriman Photograph Collection

P07_44_02 - Harriman Photograph Collection

Sheafe's Warehouse at its original location, Mechanic Street, Portsmouth, NH. Seen on the left is the cemetery wall of Point of Graves, and behind the warehouse is the old Memorial Bridge. The building was believed to be owned by the Wentworth family, but in the early 20th century, Cappy Stewart, a local antique dealer, named it the Sheafe's Warehouse.